Winemaking Philosophy

Great wines start in the vineyard. We believe in the power of terroir and always work together with nature. The quality of the grapes is our main priority. To ensure the highest standard, we treat our vineyards with great care. Our yields are reduced to 2,500 Liter per hectare in order to concentrate the power of the vine. We don’t use irrigation and harvest by hand. This allows us to sort the grapes before and after they have reached the winery. Only the best ones make it into our wines.
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From the vineyards
to the cellar

Over the past few decades, the land of our current vineyards had not been used for agricultural purposes. The soils – a mixture of sand, loam and clay – have thus been able to find their own perfect balance. Their composition plays a major role on our choice of planting different grape varieties. While Petit Verdot benefits from more clayey soils that provide a higher nutrient content, the sandy, loamy soil delivers better drainage for Syrah.

When the grapes have reached their perfect ripeness, the highlight of the work in the vineyards takes place: the harvest. We pick our grapes entirely by hand and thus ensure that only the best grapes find their way into the cellar.

At the winery, the quality of the grapes is checked on two vibrating tables before they are approved for vinification. We endeavour to have as little mechanical impact on the grapes as possible i.e.  no usage of pumps.

After fermentation our reds age in French Barriques as well as in stainless steel tanks for minimum 8 – 14 months. The whites also spend at least three months in stainless steel to give them better structure and balance. After bottling, our Reservas age another 2 – 3 years in bottle before general release. They have an aging potential of at least 15 – 20 years.

Villa Velis
our wines

Our wines impress with structure, character, and aging potential. From elegant mineral whites through to complex multidimensional reds. The Reservas age in French oak barrels, which contributes to their well-integrated tannic structure.
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